Tweens & Teens Gaming Night at the Cambridge Library


Tweens and teens flooded into the Cambridge Library last Thursday evening, December 3rd to play video games, online games, board games, and card games. Guitar Hero tunes, Wii gaming tunes, and the din of engaged 11-16 year-olds was the backdrop for the evening. Pizza, pop, and prizes were enjoyed by over 60 participants.

The evening was sponsored by the Cambridge Friends of the Library.

Nancy Dunbar, Cambridge Branch Librarian

Cambridge Library Friends Awarded $1000


The Cambridge Friends of the Library received a $1000 cash award for the best Friends of the Library project in the State of Minnesota at the Minnesota Library Association convention in St. Cloud this past October. Lorie Fetzik, 2009 Cambridge Friends of the Library co-president, accepted the Evie Nordley Award on behalf of the Friends.

The Evy Nordley Award was presented by the Minnesota Association of Library Friends. The award recognizes the importance of Friends of the Library projects and the impact they have on their local libraries. Second and third place winners went to the Friends of the Lake City and Pelican Rapids Public Libraries.


The Cambridge Friends won the award for their 2009 Community Wide Read program which featured the Night Birds by Thomas Maltman, a book about the Sioux Uprising of 1876. The Community Wide Read Program included book discussion groups, a documentary and a hoop dance presentation by Dallas Chief Eagle. A companion children’s book about the Sioux Uprising, Battle Cry by Jan Neubert Schultz, was also part of the program. The award was judged on the impact of the project, the objectives, cost effectiveness, collaboration, planning, the target audience and funding sources.


Along with the $1000 cash award, the Friends were given a beautiful plaque representing their accomplishments. The award is on display at the Cambridge Public Library. Congratulations Cambridge Friends of the Library!

Vickie Sorn

Youth & Community Services Librarian

THE ROAD to Cormac McCarthy

When No Country For Old Men won the Best Picture Academy Award in 2007 I told myself, “I must read Cormac McCarthy.”
I didn’t get around to it, however, until recently. I knew that All the Pretty Horses, volume one of “The Border Trilogy”, had received both the 1992 National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Then The Road was awarded the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.
Last week I picked up The Road, thumbed through it, and noted the absence of quotation marks to indicate dialogue. Finding this somewhat distracting, I laid the book aside and turned to a different novel. Yesterday I picked up McCarthy’s book again—-and finished it this morning.
A man and his son, both unnamed, struggle to survive in a post-apocalyptic world. Possessed of meager provisions and a pistol with two bullets, the man convinces the boy that some kind of salvation exists near the sea. Through a blighted landscape of gray ash, dead trees, and chilling temperatures, the reader joins them on the road, encountering harrowing instances of debased humanity, cannibalism, and despair. The boy, who has never known any other life, seems, at times, touched by God, for he is ever aware of the fact that he and his father are the “good guys” who “carry the fire”. Eventually the man succumbs to disease, starvation, and exposure—yet remains convinced that “Goodness will find the little boy. It always has. It will again.”
The Road has been called both “a masterpiece” by Booklist and “a novel of horrific beauty” by Kirkus Reviews. I agree. The book, deceptively simple and straightforward, is devastating and reminds us that the world teeters on the edge of the abyss.
On June 5, 2007, McCarthy sat down with Oprah Winfrey for his first and only television interview. When asked about his writing, McCarthy said he prefers simple, direct sentences and refuses to muddy up his text with “weird little marks” (quotation marks). The video can viewed on Oprah’s site: http://www.oprah.com/. Just enter his name in the “Search oprah.com” field on the upper right of the screen.
Directed by John Hillcoat, the film adaptation has just been released in theatres and is receiving generally favorable reviews. Viggo Mortensen, whom many will remember as Aragorn in The Lord of the Rings trilogy, plays the man.
East Central Regional Library owns all of McCarthy’s works in various formats: regular print, large print, audio, VHS, and DVD. Access our homepage at https://www.ecrlib.org/ and click on “ECRL Catalog” if you’d like to request a specific item. Remember that library staff are a quick phone call away if you need assistance.

Bob Gray
Reference and Interlibrary Loan Librarian