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Japanese Art of Paper Folding at the Cambridge Public Library

Ages 12 through adult are encouraged to participate in Folders to Books: Japanese Paper Folding from 2-4 p.m. Thursday, June 29 at Cambridge Public Library. This kind of Japanese folder is a single piece of decorative paper folded several times to create multiple pockets. By itself it’s perfect for storing papers, cards and even CDs.

Registration is required. Sign up at the front desk, call and ask for the Cambridge Public Library at 763-689-7390 or send an email to cambridge@ecrlib.org. Space is limited.

Make a Tunnel Book at the Pine City Public Library 

Ages 12 through adult can count on the Pine City Public Library for an event that will challenge you to think creatively as you explore depth perspective with text and image.  Mark your calendars for Thursday, June 29 at 6:30 pm.   Registration is required and space is limited.  Sign up at the library or call 320-629-6403 and ask for the Pine City Public Library.

The workshops are funded with money from Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

The Other Einstein Discussion Questions

Are you reading The Other Einstein along with us during the Big Library Read? Join us in a conversation below, or use these questions to discuss with your Book Club or those around you!

  1. Discuss the various ways that gender affects the characters in this novel. Do you think gender would influence Mileva’s life in the same way if she lived today?
  2. How do the characters in the book—Mileva, Albert, their friends, their parents—experience religion, and does that change over the course of the story? How do Mileva’s and Albert’s different understandings of religiosity impact their relationship to each other?
  3. This novel can be seen as a quest for understanding, a search for the divine in the natural order of the world. How does the study of math and physics become this quest for Albert and Mileva? Are they, either separately or together, successful in their crusade? Does unpuzzling life’s mysteries have disparate meanings for them?
  4. Betrayal is a recurrent motif in the book and an unfortunate reality in Mileva’s life. What forms of betrayal does she experience? How does her reaction to those betrayals propel the story forward, for better or worse? Has Mileva engaged in betrayal herself?
  5. Discuss the setting of the book, a world on the brink of astounding scientific discoveries, political upheaval, and ultimately horrible World War I atrocities. Does this historical setting affect the characters? What role, if any, does it play in shaping their lives?
  6. Over the course of the novel, we learn a great deal about Mileva’s childhood and early adult years. What life events led her to math and science? What hurdles did she have to surmount to even get her footing on that path?
  7. From a very young age, Mileva assumes that she will never marry due to her physical disability. How is this disability both a blessing and a curse? How does her limp impact her differently at different life stages?
  8. Mileva and Albert are drawn to each other from the beginning of their years together at the Polytechnic. What qualities compel them toward one another? Is their relationship “inevitable,” as Mileva believes?
  9. Mileva and Albert share the language of science, and it knits them together. Are they equal scientific partners from the start of their relationship? Do they become the “bohemians” they so frequently discuss?
  10. Leaving Lieserl behind with her mother while she awaits Albert in Zürich and Bern is a huge, pivotal moment for Mileva. Do you think she made the right choice? Should she have stayed with Lieserl and disobeyed Albert’s request?
  11. The loss of Lieserl impacts Mileva tremendously, yet she doesn’t fully share her feelings with Albert. Why does she keep her devastation from him? Do you think she should have been more open with him?
  12. On several occasions throughout the novel, the characters undergo metamorphoses. What are Mileva’s changes, and what instigates them? Do some of them frustrate you or take too long? Does Albert change during the course of the novel? If so, how would you describe his evolution?
  13. While Mileva does not form friendships until rather late in her life, the ties she forms are deep. How do her friendships and her acquaintances with other women factor in her ultimate life choices?
  14. Albert Einstein is arguably one of the most famous figures of the twentieth century, but The Other Einstein shares a story about him that you might not have otherwise heard. Did this novel change your perception of him? About the stories we are told regarding other women in history?

You can also gain insight into the title by reading a conversation with the author, Marie Benedict!

For more information about the Big Library Read, start here.

Young and Powerful

Week 9 of AudiobookSYNC includes the audiobook debut of the earliest published stories from a teen who later became a prolific fantasy author, and a second that delves into the true history of the teens and women on whom Colonial America’s witch hysteria focused.

Do you believe in magic? Can you imagine a war between wizards? An exciting journey in an airship or down in a submarine? Would you like to meet the fastest truncheon in the Wild West?

The Witch’s Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories is the fabulously funny short-story collection from the late acclaimed storyteller Terry Pratchett, featuring stories written when Terry was just 17 years old and working as a junior reporter. Listeners will find wonder, mayhem, sorcery, and delight—as well as seeds of ideas that went on to influence his most beloved tales later in life.

 

The Witches: Salem, 1692 provides an electrifying, fresh view of the Salem witch trials. The panic began early in 1692, over an exceptionally raw Massachusetts winter, when a minister’s niece began to writhe and roar. It spread quickly, confounding the most educated men and prominent politicians in the colony. Neighbors accused neighbors, husbands accused wives, parents and children one another. It ended less than a year later, but not before 19 men and women had been hanged and an elderly man crushed to death.

Speaking loudly and emphatically, adolescent girls stood at the center of the crisis, one of the few moments when women played the central role in American history.  Author Stacy Schiff aligns early American anxieties brilliantly with our own. In an era of religious provocations, crowdsourcing, and invisible enemies, this enthralling story makes more sense than ever.

Available for a Limited Time
Remember — grab these titles before they are replaced by a new pairing on 6/29/2017! While the download time is limited, your listening time is not. Once you have downloaded the MP3 files, the eAudiobook is yours to keep.

New to SYNC? Learn more to get you started!