82nd ANNUAL ACADEMY AWARDS

On the evening of March 7, 2010, the 82nd annual Academy Awards were presented at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood.
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was officially organized on May 4, 1927, but the first “Oscars” were not awarded until May 16, 1929. That evening, in the ballroom of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, “Wings” was named “Best Picture” of the year. Emil Jannings and Janet Gaynor took home the acting prizes.
Fast forward 81 years. On March 7th the following winners were announced:

Best Picture: The Hurt Locker
Best Actor: Jeff Bridges in “Crazy Heart”
Best Actress: Sandra Bullock in “The Blind Side”
Best Supporting Actor: Christoph Waltz in “Inglorious Basterds
Best Supporting Actress: Mo’Nique in “Precious”
Best Director: Kathryn Bigelow for “The Hurt Locker”

It was a night of firsts! Bullock, Waltz, and Mo’Nique were all first-time nominees, and Bigelow was the first woman in the history of the Academy Awards to receive the “Best Director” prize. Also, for the first time since 1943, ten films were nominated for “Best Picture”.
Here are some fascinating facts about the Oscars:
Most Awards (11): “Ben-Hur“, “Titanic”, and “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King”
Most Nominations (14): “All About Eve”, “Titanic”
Most Awards – Acting (4): Katharine Hepburn
Most Nominations – Acting (16): Meryl Streep

East Central Regional Library has many Oscar-winning films on DVD and more are being added to the collection on a regular basis. Check our catalog!
The best book ever written about the Academy Awards is probably “80 Years of the Oscar” by Robert Osborne. It’s located in the central reference collection at the Cambridge library for your enjoyment and perusal.
Bob Gray
Reference and Interlibrary Loan Librarian

JOB WORRIES? CHECK OUT THESE LEGAL RESOURCES!

Minnesota Dept. of Human Rights http://www.humanrights.state.mn.us/index.html — Investigates charges of illegal discrimination under the Human Rights Act

EEOC (http://www.eeoc.gov/) — Equal Employment Opportunity Commission investigates charges pertaining to employment discrimination

American Civil Liberties Union ( http://www.aclu.org/)– National organization advocating individual rights, by litigating, legislating, and educating the public

The library has other sites of interest pertaining to legal issues and employment discrimination on our “Reference Links” page:

—Access the library homepage: http://www.ecrlib.org/

—Click on “Reference Desk” on the left, then “Web Links”

—Click on the “Legal Resources” link

If you need assistance, please feel free to contact your nearest ECRL branch library.

Although staff cannot offer legal advice or assistance, they can refer you to appropriate literature, reference books, websites, and other resources.

Bob Gray
Reference and Interlibrary Loan Librarian

WHAT’S IT WORTH? The Library Can Help!

Like many people, I enjoy poking around flea markets, antique shows, and book fairs.

Michael Sparks does, also. In 2006 he was browsing through a thrift store in Nashville, Tennessee, and purchased an old print of the Declaration of Independence for $2.48; on March 22, 2007, he sold that “old print” at auction for $477,650.

Did he know what he had? Perhaps not. I wonder if he contacted his local library and asked the reference librarian, “What’s it worth?”

Yes! The library has a rich collection of resources that can help you determine the value of your flea market find or that dusty antique in grandma’s attic.

Three of the best general guidebooks are:


“Kovels’ Antiques & Collectibles Price List 2008”


“Schroeder’s Antiques Price Guide”


“Warman’s Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide 2009”


Reference staff can also guide you to books that cover very specific areas of collecting, such as coins, dolls, guns, pottery, and toys—even Civil War memorabilia.

Stop by the library in Cambridge and browse the extensive collection of reference books we have on display near the magazine shelves. These materials can be used freely within the library. If you need something to check out, staff may be able to locate circulating copies for you.

And keep an eye out for that one-of-a-kind treasure. If Michael Sparks can find it, perhaps you can, too.

I’m still looking!

Bob Gray
Reference and Adult Services Librarian

My Health Minnesota Go Local at Rotary

June 30, 2010 Note: The website referenced in this blog post has been decommissioned by the National Library of Medicine. More information about the decision to end its support is available at this technical bulletin.

The University of Minnesota Alumni Association sponsored the program for Cambridge Rotary this noon. The speaker they brought was librarian Karla Block from the UM Bio-Medical Library. Karla talked about the on-line resource My Health Minnesota Go Local, which is part of the National Library of Medicine partnership with libraries and library consortia to provide national coverage of health services. The Minnesota site is one of 24 Go Local projects with many more in development.

Go Local is a tool to bring accurate information about health services in local geographic areas, including hospitals, physicians, nursing homes, support groups, health screening providers and many others.

Go Local is linked on the ECRL site under the menu bar Reference Desk. Look at the Reference Desk section to find links and information guides from ECRL librarians.

Go Local at Rotary
Karla Block, Associate Librarian at the Bio-Medical Library

Barbara Misselt, ECRL Director